We would love to hear from you. Click on the ‘Contact Us’ link to the right and choose your favorite way to reach-out!

wscdsdc

media/speaking contact

Jamie Johnson

business contact

Victoria Peterson

Contact Us

855.ask.wink

Close [x]
pattern

Blog + Articles

Categories

  • Industry Articles (12,278)
  • Industry Conferences (2)
  • Industry Job Openings (45)
  • Negative Media (124)
  • Positive Media (73)
  • Sheryl's Articles (471)
  • Sheryl's Blogs (147)
  • Wink's Articles (183)
  • Wink's Blogs (136)
  • Wink's Press Releases (73)
  • Blog Archives

  • March 2019
  • February 2019
  • January 2019
  • December 2018
  • November 2018
  • October 2018
  • September 2018
  • August 2018
  • July 2018
  • June 2018
  • May 2018
  • April 2018
  • March 2018
  • February 2018
  • January 2018
  • December 2017
  • November 2017
  • October 2017
  • September 2017
  • August 2017
  • July 2017
  • June 2017
  • May 2017
  • April 2017
  • March 2017
  • February 2017
  • January 2017
  • December 2016
  • November 2016
  • October 2016
  • September 2016
  • August 2016
  • July 2016
  • June 2016
  • May 2016
  • April 2016
  • March 2016
  • February 2016
  • January 2016
  • December 2015
  • November 2015
  • October 2015
  • September 2015
  • August 2015
  • July 2015
  • June 2015
  • May 2015
  • April 2015
  • March 2015
  • February 2015
  • January 2015
  • December 2014
  • November 2014
  • October 2014
  • September 2014
  • August 2014
  • July 2014
  • June 2014
  • May 2014
  • April 2014
  • March 2014
  • February 2014
  • January 2014
  • December 2013
  • November 2013
  • October 2013
  • September 2013
  • August 2013
  • July 2013
  • June 2013
  • May 2013
  • April 2013
  • March 2013
  • February 2013
  • January 2013
  • December 2012
  • November 2012
  • October 2012
  • September 2012
  • August 2012
  • July 2012
  • June 2012
  • May 2012
  • April 2012
  • March 2012
  • February 2012
  • January 2012
  • December 2011
  • November 2011
  • October 2011
  • September 2011
  • August 2011
  • July 2011
  • June 2011
  • May 2011
  • April 2011
  • March 2011
  • February 2011
  • January 2011
  • December 2010
  • November 2010
  • October 2010
  • September 2010
  • August 2010
  • July 2010
  • June 2010
  • May 2010
  • April 2010
  • March 2010
  • February 2010
  • January 2010
  • December 2009
  • November 2009
  • October 2009
  • August 2009
  • June 2009
  • May 2009
  • April 2009
  • March 2009
  • November 2008
  • May 2008
  • February 2008
  • Investors Might Be Paying Too Much for These Index Funds

    December 28, 2018 by Daren Fonda

    Investors might think index funds are a great way to capture market returns. Most index funds charge practically nothing: One of the largest, Vanguard Total Stock, charges just 0.04% a year; the average stock index fund’s expense ratio is down to 0.09%, less than a dime for every $100 invested. That has dropped from 0.27% in 2000, according to the Investment Company Institute, the fund industry’s lobbying group.

    ………………………………………………….

    Click HERE to read the full story via Barron’s. 

    Article excerpt: 

    Another pool of high-fee funds sits in variable annuities, insurance contracts that hold stocks, bonds, or other financial assets in “sub-accounts.” Industry-wide, these sub-accounts hold more than $106 billion in index funds with expense ratios averaging 0.59%, according to data from Morningstar. That’s partly because these funds don’t have to compete against low-cost versions that investors may buy outside the insurance wrapper, says Todd Cipperman, founder of Cipperman Compliance Services, a financial consulting firm based in Wayne, Pa.

    Funds in annuities can be packed with “trailing commissions,” fees that compensate brokers for selling products, says Jeffrey Cutter, a financial advisor in Falmouth, Mass. “People’s chins are on the floor,” he says, when they find out the total costs in annuities, which can add up to nearly 6% in administrative and fund expenses.

    Another factor: Insurance salespeople must provide investors with reams of disclosures, including fund prospectuses, when they sell a variable annuity. But the prospectuses are complex and voluminous, running hundreds of pages, and fees may be buried deep within the paperwork. “The problem is there’s so much disclosure that people get overwhelmed, and it becomes less than clear what the fees are,” says the compliance expert Cipperman.

    The Securities and Exchange Commission recently proposed rules to allow insurance carriers to provide investors with summary prospectuses. But providing summary prospectuses would be voluntary, and the new rules wouldn’t do anything to address underlying fund fees. “They can still charge whatever they want so long as they don’t breach their fiduciary duty that the fees aren’t too high,” says Cipperman.

     

    Originally Posted at Barron's on December 28, 2018 by Daren Fonda.

    Categories: Industry Articles
    currency